Before Getting A Tattoo: Let’s Choose the Right Kanji

The people, who are good at observing, often notice the small differences between the same kanji symbols. Especially when you are getting a tattoo, you may want to know why there are the differences.

Today I’ll share a question from a follower like this.


I want to get “Lone Wolf” in Japanese kanji tattooed but I see two different versions that are extremely similar. Can you help me and let me know which one is accurate?

Before Getting A Tattoo: Let’s Choose the Right Kanji

A

Before Getting A Tattoo: Let’s Choose the Right Kanji

B


I see! They are written in the 2 different fonts. Both of them are fine! If I would get the tattoo, I’ll pick B though. Because it looks more proper for me, and I like thick strong strokes better for kanji.

Japanese language has the standard rules about strokes(what Japanese kids learn at school), but the certain “mistakes” outside of school are very acceptable and they are not considered as mistakes. Keeping the stroke order and proportions are more important.

3 ways to end the stroke in Japanese letters

Technically, there are 3 ways to end the stroke in Japanese letters: とめ(tome), はね(hane), and はらい(harai).

  • とめ(tome): You stop the writing implements then you lift it off the paper.
  • はね(hane): You stop the writing implements then you turn upward when you lift it off the paper.
  • はらい(harai): You lift up the writing implements slowly when you take it off the paper in order to make the stroke thinner toward the end.
Example of the 3 ways to end the stroke

Example of the 3 ways to end the stroke

I wrote 侍(samurai) this way for my shirt design, because it looks proper and awesome. But I usually end the first stroke with a tome when I write a note with a pen. (‘ω’)ノ

 

Thank you for the question! Good luck on your kanji tattoo!

 


Today’s Kanji Shirt is “Samurai”! The lone wolf samurai is cool.

samurai kanji shirt


If you want to know the meanings of any Japanese kanji that you don’t see English subs for in a particular animation or live action movie, tell me “Name of the Show”, “Season and Episode #” and “the Exact Moment (Minute: Second) if it’s available”!

If it’s just Japanese kanji that you see around you, like a shop sign or a tattoo, you can send me the photo as long as you are allowed to take picture of it.

I can’t promise to reply to everyone but I’ll try my best!

Email to: info@kansaichick.com